How Has Education Changed In The Last 100 Years

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How Has Education Changed In The Last 100 Years

How Has Education Changed In The Last 100 Years

Welcoming a brand new year made me think about the years to come. What might the next 100 years of education look like?

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Finland is often recognized as having one of the best education systems in the world, but even the most efficient education systems are not future proof. January is traditionally a time to look to the future, so we can’t help but learn about what the future holds for us. We picked the brains of over 100 educators, experts and thought leaders to find out what education might look like in the next 100 years.

There is an unequivocal consensus that education needs radical changes. Educators and policy makers need the courage to think, challenge and innovate to create schools worthy of the next generation. And rapid technological advances, explosive population growth, an almost unrecognizable job market, among other social and environmental challenges, mean that even the most powerful scientists have no time to rest on their laurels. It will not be an exaggeration to say that the future of the young generation is largely in their hands. In fact, that’s why many people are attracted to this profession.

While individual educators work passionately and tirelessly to do what is right for children, they are often lost in the mire of bureaucracy and a system that is more interested in proving that the teacher is doing his job than in allowing him the freedom to do his job. This cannot continue.

“We pretend we’re doing what’s best for the kids, but we’re not. We have done what suits us, and that must change.” This is the stark observation of Professor Stefan Heppel, who believes that the starting point for any decision should always be “how good children can be and be surprised”. Then go from there rather than thinking about how convenient things can be.

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“We pretend we’re doing what’s best for the kids, but we’re not. We have done what suits us and that has to change.”

It is important that the future of education is built on sound research and evidence, not on expediency, political whims, and personal guesswork. “If we follow the evidence in schools, as neuroscientists understand more and more about how the brain works and how we learn, we will be able to take this understanding and improve the way we teach young people,” says Sir John Holman.

“For example, we are now beginning to learn about the structure of the school day, adolescent circadian rhythms and their optimality, how best to sequence learning between early learning and reinforcement, all to inspire positive learning. In the next 100 years, we will understand more and be able to design the school day smarter. We all need to take much more of what we learn from neuroscience into the future.

How Has Education Changed In The Last 100 Years

But in 2018, entire school systems continue to ignore the evidence, forcing teenagers to start school early despite warnings about how it can harm their learning. This is just one example of ingrained tradition and convenience that future schools will have to work harder to remove.

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“In 100 years, schools will be places where you can learn comfortably, so you don’t have to sit in chairs.” – Daniel, age 8

Professor Stephen Heppel gives another example. “If you try to design a chair that is anti-reading, it will prevent children from reading, you will find today’s school chair design… but if you ask the children, they will tell you. Do it well. They ask each other and say: “When we read, we read like this, so our reading should be like this.”

8-year-old Daniel from Finland agrees with this opinion. His hopes for the future of education are clear. “I hope that in 100 years, schools will be places where you don’t have to sit on a chair, but where you can study comfortably.

So why do we use these school chairs? “Because they match well,” continues Professor Heppel, “that’s the only reason… there are 2.2 billion children in the world and no one is asking how they can improve learning. It is a waste of opportunity. Given the number of children we have and the conditions in the world, it is very difficult not to see that education is being changed not by children, but by children.

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And what do young people want from education? hammocks, hologram teachers and good food. Finnish students are used to such a high standard of education, their hopes for the next 100 years are shockingly humble (and sweetly humorous – watch the full video). But in these imaginative answers, the students emphasized: A desire for more educated teachers in specific fields, flexible seating, independent learning and the best education system in the world. Oh, and iPads, of course.

It seems almost an understatement that the classroom of the future will be transformed by technology. A.I, A.R, V.R etc. are now playing a central role in emerging education, as is ABC. Technology is advancing so impressively that experts predict integrated artificial intelligence, 3D printed meals and underwater cities will be the new normal within 100 years. No one knows how technology will change education in the coming century, but we can certainly agree that advances will change the learning landscape.

Caroline Stewart, head of education at the New Zealand Learning Network, predicts that studying for the sake of knowledge is a thing of the past. “The next 100 years of education will be about adapting and changing to a time when knowledge is innate, where education is not about learning. Whether it’s imprinted in your DNA or downloaded into your neocortex, we’re rapidly moving toward a time when knowledge is innate, it’s what you know. Therefore, education is not about giving information to students, but about helping them to instinctively use what they already know. And that changes everything.

How Has Education Changed In The Last 100 Years

“The next 100 years of Finnish education must focus on human interaction. The Industrial Revolution made us more efficient beings, but now our lives are less about production and more about what we create between us.”

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For better or worse, technology is changing every aspect of our lives. But an edtech-filled future doesn’t (necessarily) mean we’re heading blindly toward the sterile, mechanized classroom that some may fear. Kahoot is a game-based learning platform with over 50 million users worldwide that is popular among learners and teachers, especially in BYOD classrooms.

Kahoot co-founder Johan Brand believes that technology provides the perfect springboard for developing soft skills. As he says, “Digitalization is a way to enhance our human side (…) Finnish education for the next 100 years must focus on interaction between people. The Industrial Revolution made us more efficient creatures, but now our lives are less about production and more about what we create between us. The next 100 years will involve us being more respectful of each other, leading to less conflict, and education will be challenged to break down our boundaries and focus on communication and cooperation between us as humans.

Beyond becoming tech-dependent cyborgs, many educators envision a future where children learn more about what it means to be human, how to find their passion, and how to follow their potential. In the next 100 years, Finnish educator and scientist Pasi Salberg says: “I hope that schools will act in such a way that every person will be encouraged to find their passion, their fire, and through it be able to change their life and the world. Because without it there will be no change.”

Any discussion of the future inevitably turns to the challenges facing humanity. It is predicted that by 2050, just 32 years from now, 10% of the planet’s population will be at risk of forced displacement due to climate change, and that ocean fish stocks will be completely depleted. Given the scale of the challenges, it is not clear what kind of world children will be living in 100 years from now.

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With this in mind, it is not surprising that the discourse focuses not only on helping learners realize their dreams, but also on their responsibilities to society. Students must learn to be good citizens, to make positive changes, to question, to challenge, and to stand up for what is right.

“The next 100 years of education will have to teach children more about the world they live in,” said Sophie Dean, CEO of children’s media company Bright Little Labs, which creates educationally valuable, gender-neutral apps and games for children. Not just the pocket

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