How Has Technology Changed In The Past 10 Years

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How Has Technology Changed In The Past 10 Years

How Has Technology Changed In The Past 10 Years

Today, technology plays a more important role in society than ever before. It has changed and will change every aspect of our existence. It will change the way we communicate, conduct business, learn and teach, and even the way our brains work. Since the advent of technology, the learning environment has changed. Students have more opportunities than they think. In the past, people only studied in the classroom. But now people just need a computer and WIFI. They learn at their convenience, at home or in a coffee shop. As students’ skills, knowledge and needs change, so does the teacher’s role. To provide the best possible learning experience, we as teaching professionals must adapt and find new ways to meet the changing needs of our students. We must understand and accept the meaning and implications of these changes in the learning process. There are four ways technology is changing the way people learn: 1) From individual learning to collaborative learning We typically learn through individual courses and activities. There are students, yes, but they are kept to a minimum. However, with the introduction of new technologies, learning has shifted from an almost individual effort to a collaborative effort. By cooperative learning, it refers to a situation where two or more people are learning or trying to learn together. When we talk about collaborative learning, we think of problem-solving, discussion, reflection, and other ways in which students become an active part of the learning process. C collaboration is no longer considered a nice add-on, it has become a necessary feature. In fact, many tools, from social networks to instant messaging apps, facilitate or even encourage collaboration. Get Google Drive, Dropbox, Evernote, and popular task management software like Astrid and Todoist. This app is collaboration ready. These are the inevitable consequences of the Internet. We can now communicate with people anytime and anywhere, in real time or not. In a web session or web-connected classroom, students from all over the world join together in a virtual classroom to ask each other for help. They find others who share their interests and collaborate with them as their courses progress. Collaborative processes and better tools now, above all, make up for the lack of “human touch” that has long criticized online learning. Technology is no longer a barrier to authentic interaction. Rather, it’s an opportunity for students to have a more personalized, learning experience, especially online. It’s not just a cognitive process, but it also helps students “get to know each other, develop social relationships, confidence and belonging, and build a sense of online community.” 2) From passive learning to active or brain-based learning This shift from passive learning to active learning or from a teacher-centered approach to a learner-centered approach is perhaps the most important positive result of technology. Students are no longer just receivers of content that take notes or listen to the teacher talk for hours on end. . They expect something different when learning. They want to actually participate or express their opinion. A sense of control over their lessons. These active students usually turn to mobile applications to learn anytime and anywhere. They turn to websites. Information direct access and, sa Finally, solving problems. They still look to their teacher or instructor, but only for guidance. Then technology becomes an active learning tool. In this way, students can search, discuss and solve problems. Every time they surf the web, they have instant access to a huge library of information. The Internet offers them a lot of data, not just text. The web is not linear, but hypermedia. Most importantly, the Internet offers them the freedom to study in any way they choose. Students can be authors and problem solvers, not just spectators. Passive actions are obsolete, and teachers now play another important role as guides. Sig Behren, SEO of Blackboard, confirmed this in an article he wrote for USNews last year. “If we want to engage truly engaged learners, learning needs to be open, mobile, social and analytical,” he said. learning experience. Students in any “grade” may have many performance needs, but not all have the same learning goals. Each of them has their own problems, agendas, abilities, values ​​and priorities. Therefore, it is important to introduce different types of teaching for different students. No single method can meet all of their learning needs. Content delivery requires a flexible and personalized approach. Technology ultimately not only facilitates collaborative learning, but also allows educators to meet the individual needs of students. In fact, a hybrid of independent study, individual study, and group study has been proven time and time again to be effective. Differentiation expert Carol Tomlinson has documented student achievement based on learning profiles and readiness levels. Technology ultimately not only facilitates collaborative learning, but also allows educators to meet the individual needs of students. It offers students a variety of ways to learn content; to process, create or understand ideas. In fact, a hybrid of self-study, adaptive guidance, and peer support has repeatedly proven effective. Differentiation expert Carol Tomlinson has documented student achievement based on learning profiles and readiness levels. 4. The Multitasking Phenomenon Multitasking with technology is considered “easy,” especially among young adults who are likely to participate in educational research (Carrier, Cheever, Rosen, Benitez, & Chang, 2009). However, it has been proven that in many cases, the brain cannot perform two complex tasks at the same time. This is possible only if both tasks are very simple and they do not compete with each other for the same mental resources. Imagine a student switching from one tab to another or from a desktop screen to a smartphone screen. It will take you more than an hour to finish reading less than 1000 words. He remembered less than half of it, and some facts got mixed up. The culprit, obviously, is a lack of focus. He multitasks so he can’t concentrate on his studies. The growing number of multitasking, easily distracted learners is an insurmountable challenge for eLearning professionals. Multitasking media has a negative impact on the way information is received and processed.

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Carla is an inbound marketer @Aura Interactiva, developer of SHIFT. ES: Carla is an inbound marketer @Aura Interactiva, developer of SHIFT.

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